Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

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Mr Bill
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Re: Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

Postby Mr Bill » May 20th, 2015, 9:07 am

I read the DK forum because I like doing WSR and I like to see what people have to say about WSR.
There are other forums, some of which are by invitation only.
Which one is the best?
Opinions vary. That's what makes this world an interesting place.

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Re: Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

Postby tre » May 20th, 2015, 10:22 am

I think I'll refer damage with water in it to the shop for now. I'll get some of the proper burs though. Brent, do you recommend the spring hammer for use on pre-existing damage in order to open it up? Also, you referred to a drilling technique, can you elaborate? Should I be doing something different than just drilling regularly and using the gauge from the spring hammer?

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Brent Deines
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Re: Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

Postby Brent Deines » May 20th, 2015, 4:27 pm

I rarely drill pre-existing damage and never use the spring hammer to open it up. Why not? No need! If you are using a Delta Kits injector properly you should rarely, rarely ever have to drill anything except the ends of long cracks and you should not have to use anything to open up the damage. If you find yourself needing to do either of these things on a regular basis in order to get the damage to fill properly there is something in your procedure that needs correcting.

When drilling the end of a long crack using the 26020 carbide bur you should rotate the drill in a circular movement to make the top of the hole slightly larger than you would if you drilled straight into the glass. I can't explain why that works better than simply using a bur one size larger that is the same shape but it does. Remember that tapered burs skip across the glass quite easily if you try to start drilling straight on so always hold the drill at an angle and hold it firmly with both hands when you start your hole. Once you have it started turn the drill upright and drill slightly deeper before you start the circular movement. I thought spring hammer video showed the hole being drilled but I just checked and it does not. We'll try to make a video showing how to drill the perfect hole to get the best results with the spring hammer soon. Thanks for your patience!

Keep in mind water still needs to be removed even if you have the vehicle in your shop and the procedure isn't any different regardless of where you do the repair.

Also keep in mind that if I was just trying to sell tools, as some on this forum would have you believe, I would recommend drilling every repair so I could sell you more burs. My recommendations are based on what I believe are best practices and products and procedures I use myself. We sell many products that I don't use myself because other technicians request them but I will never try to sell you something I don't use myself. Not everyone will agree with me, but then again not everyone does good repairs and very few have as much experience using Delta Kits equipment as I do. If you search my posts you will find that I always recommend technicians refer to the mfg of their equipment if they want to know how best to use it, not someone who may or may not be using it properly and certainly not from someone who doesn't even use it.

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Re: Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

Postby screenman » May 20th, 2015, 10:49 pm

I work by the "if in doubt dry it out" rule.

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Re: Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

Postby tre » May 21st, 2015, 11:30 am

Thanks for elaborating on the drilling procedure.

Brent Deines wrote:Keep in mind water still needs to be removed even if you have the vehicle in your shop and the procedure isn't any different regardless of where you do the repair.


My hope is that the techs there have a way of dealing with moisture.


I haven't been drilling bullseyes or stars, but I have been drilling everything else. My biggest issue has been with half moons. And especially half moons that have an impact point separate from the moon. What I do currently is drill the impact point or drill just inside of the edge of the middle of the moon shape. I set up my bridge, usually pretty light. When I put in the resin I make some final tweaking on the bridge, I like to see the resin surround the edge, but not dripping down. I insert my injector while in vacuum mode, then switch to pressure after it is screwed in. Then apply a little pressure. I then flex the glass, wait a few minutes, switch to vacuum and flex the glass, and keep switching between pressure and vacuum and flexing the grass. 99% of my customers wait there, so I probably will only spend a maximum 15 minutes of my time going through pressure and vacuum cycles.


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