Prcatice

Discuss all aspects of headlight restoration, including marketing, technical, and business advice.
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jgravittjr
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Prcatice

Post by jgravittjr » September 18th, 2017, 1:17 pm

Surely this has been covered before, but I was wondering whats the best kit to start with and what did you guys use to practice on?

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Brent Deines
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Re: Prcatice

Post by Brent Deines » September 19th, 2017, 2:00 pm

Obviously I recommend the Delta Kits headlight restoration system

If you don't have a car available you can pick up practice headlights at wrecking yards for a few bucks each. We lock them into a Rockwell Jawhorse for demos but headlight restoration is one of the few things I have come across that really doesn't take much practice at to produce stellar results if you are using the right system and products. As long as you are careful not to damage the paint or metal surrounding the headlight you should see very good results on your first attempt, and if you are not happy you can sand it down again and do it over. It really is that simple! However, doing at least one practice headlight before you tackle a customer's car will provide you with a lot of confidence.

jgravittjr
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Re: Prcatice

Post by jgravittjr » September 20th, 2017, 1:16 pm

Brent Deines wrote:Obviously I recommend the Delta Kits headlight restoration system

If you don't have a car available you can pick up practice headlights at wrecking yards for a few bucks each. We lock them into a Rockwell Jawhorse for demos but headlight restoration is one of the few things I have come across that really doesn't take much practice at to produce stellar results if you are using the right system and products. As long as you are careful not to damage the paint or metal surrounding the headlight you should see very good results on your first attempt, and if you are not happy you can sand it down again and do it over. It really is that simple! However, doing at least one practice headlight before you tackle a customer's car will provide you with a lot of confidence.
Oh yes sir, I definitely will do a few trial runs first.

Thank you for all your responses.

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