question about cold weather

Post your windshield repair tips, questions, advice! Note there is a sub-forum specifically for business development questions.
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vanes
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Post by vanes » October 23rd, 2003, 5:32 am

I am thinking of doing ws repair and was wondering how cold it can be out side and still do a repair I am from Iowa and it gets pretty cold :?:
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Jeff
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Brinks Trucks

Post by Coitster » October 23rd, 2003, 6:54 am

Jeff,
I used to have to scrap ice off of windshields in the snow to do repairs. As far as I am concerned it doesn't matter how cold it is.
David
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Winter in Iowa

Post by vanes » October 23rd, 2003, 6:13 pm

Thanks Gary and David
I was just wondering what I was going to do this winter I also do interior repair and paint front ends and bumpers of cars and pull out dents and give wax jobs but I Think I will like doing ws repair better than all other stuff
Jeff
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Post by Coitster » October 23rd, 2003, 6:19 pm

Hey Vans,
You do dents??? Me to, I also do PDR. BTW there is a post about cold weather repairs. I used to live in a cold climate and yes I scrap ice off windshields but I don't do the repair if the window is cold. I heat the window up slowly so I don't crack it out. I made mention of that in a earlyer post.
David
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Post by Repair1 » October 23rd, 2003, 9:39 pm

I completly agree with Gary good suggestions :!: I wish there was a magic way to bring the car to 70 degrees all the time :lol:

Brian

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Post by benfish » November 2nd, 2003, 11:28 pm

I've been doing repairs in Colorado for 20 years now. I hate winter, but have learned that there are two secrets to cold weather repair.

1. Don't attempt to dry out breaks - come back tomorrow, or if you're in for a spell of weather, insist that the car stay in a garage overnight.

2. Heat a large portion of the windshield surrounding the break - I use a 20,000 candlepower spotlight that plugs into the cigarette lighter, and I have built a holder for it that rests on the dash and front seat so I can get it close to the break. Don't leave it too close for more than 5 or 6 minutes, or it will get too hot. Cold repairs take twice as long to do, but it's a great time to beat out the (summer help) competition.

Peace & Plenty,
benfish

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Post by vanes » December 1st, 2003, 5:26 am

Thanks For all the input
Jeff A Van Es

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Post by GlassStarz » December 1st, 2003, 8:38 am

Im in Vermont up on the Canadian Boarder I work as long as stuff isnt fallin out the sky and have some sun as I prefer to use daylight not my uv light. I find below 10 degrees is too long a process resulting in me freezin my ass off so I try not to work when its too cold but actually you can work in the cold. I keep my gear in the heated car so my stuff isnt cold I cover the injector with a rag to keep the cold off it and run the defoger on the vehicle im working on. Repairs take longer to do when its cold because the resin gets thicker so often I will use a thinner resin on these days. Sometimes the match on the inside of the windshield will help if its going too slow. The biggest problem I have found is if the glass is to cold the pit filler will not bond correctly to the pit so hopefully at this point of the repair the defoger has brought the glass to the proper temp. working in the cold is a pain but if I didnt do it I wouldnt work much around here.

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Post by GRT » December 5th, 2003, 11:26 pm

And to think I b..ch about working in the cold weather in south Texas. Y'all have made me see the error of my ways. Many Thanks.

Nuts,

Gary T.

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