Is this repairable?

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Dark5tar
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Post by Dark5tar » November 8th, 2003, 9:53 pm

I have a crack in my windshield that is in a circle formation with a center impact point. Its about 5x5in in size. You cant feel it from the inside of the window.

Is this repairable?

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Is this repairable?

Post by Coitster » November 8th, 2003, 9:54 pm

Sure, I would think you can fix it.
Glass

mafsu
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Post by mafsu » November 9th, 2003, 2:18 am

Yes, I have repaired quite a few windshields with that type of damage.

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Post by Dave M » November 9th, 2003, 7:44 am

Dark5tar,
Without seeing the break, I would have to disagree. If your break is as big as you described (little bigger than a softball) I would NOT do the repair. The overall length of that break must be around 16-17 inches!
Is the damage in front of the driver's view?

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Post by desertstars » November 9th, 2003, 3:40 pm

Hmmm. If it's what I'm envisioning, I usually drill into it in three places and then treat it like a straight crack.

That allows the pushed air to expel out of the drill holes and facilitates the resin movement.

(Multiple drilling is normally not necessary on a straight crack. It already has a hole at one end.)

Start at the top, watch the resin flow, slowly move your bridge along the crack never allowing the bridge to move ahead of the resin flow, assure that you keep pressure on the resin while covering the rear- filled area with curing tab.

The more black (air) in the crack, the easier I find it can be repaired.

Dave M's caveat is apropos.

If it is not as I envision the damage, this procedure won't apply.

I think. Therefore, I am. I think.

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school

Post by gold star wsr » November 10th, 2003, 5:35 pm

If you can feel it from the inside, the damage extends to both layers of the glass, and most probably the laminate is also damaged as well. When this is the case, I recommend replacement, as it is my understanding that the integrity of the windshield is too compromised to affect a safe repair. (Please correct me if I am wrong, and offer specific proof, not just opinion). Yes, if what you are looking for is a purely cosmetic fix, that can be accomplished, but if you are concerned with safety (your own, or your passengers), then you should give serious thought to replacement; especially if your vehicle is equipped with airbags. These are designed to meet the resistance of the windshield before they inflate to protect the passenger ... and in the case of severely damaged glass & laminate, this resistence may not be sufficient for the air bag to perform properly... explodiing through the windshield and into air, rather than offering the protection for which they are designed.

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Post by desertstars » November 10th, 2003, 7:56 pm

Exactly, gold star. But, he did say he couldn't feel it from the inside.

Incidentally, it's a good idea to use a probe when checking that possibility. One will hear a "click" when passing over any inside damage.

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Post by gold star wsr » November 10th, 2003, 10:02 pm

My mistake. Thanks. In that case, there is a good possibility for successful repair, providing the damage is not directly in the line of vision, in which case, I would stilll recommend replacement.
The cracks of this type that I have dealt with have all had a tendancy to ooze resin out the surface, making it difficult to reach and hold pressure or vacuum. So the first thing I would do is glaze the length of the crack with a thin layer of high viscosity pit resin and cure it off. This will seal the surface and prevent oozing, but because it is thick, it will not be absorbed into the crack, so the flow of repair resin will not be inhibited.

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pit filler

Post by boyd » November 12th, 2003, 7:21 am

I'm with David M. Not me. I've seen those type before. I can see it now.... I bet it's not a single circle. It's multiple circles with all of them being surfaced cracks with thick black areas inside of them. It's soo much air it's hard to get all of it out. And if you do, you still have quite a bit of damaged area. It will take you all of an hour to do it , if you do a "normal" repair in 15-20 min. If it's a 198o Dodge Dart with 189k miles on it then do it. Anything newer I'd say get a new w/s.

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Post by desertstars » November 12th, 2003, 10:48 am

One of the comments I didn't make was: "why bother?"

I assumed it was for himself or an uninsured friend or relative.

Under other circumstances, I wouldn't take the time.

Nor would I if it were multiple concentric cracks.

But, in regard to Boyd's post.

Personally, I've found that the thicker the crack, the easier it is to fill. Kind of like watching the resin flow into a bulleye as opposed to a star-break. Some of the resin does ooze out of the crack but that is a plus in my mind and not a minus as long as that resin is not allowed to cure during the repair.

But, whatever works for each of us.

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