I got a resin problem.

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Jbrodie
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I got a resin problem.

Post by Jbrodie » October 7th, 2009, 10:00 pm

The resin and the Mityvac I've been using for months isn't filling in the chips and cracks like they used too. Should I change my vicosity go to something thinner? The resin I'm using now is 20 cps vicosity.
In the last week I've switched over to using a thin resin to do these repairs. I've also gone back to using my reliable bridge and piston with a thin vicosity resin. Any ideas would be helpful.

Another question which cps represents a high vicosity and which is a low vicosity? I got an idea but i want to hear form you guys who knows there stuff to set it straight in my mind.

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Re: I got a resin problem.

Post by Frank EU » October 8th, 2009, 1:03 am

I have no experience with the Mityvac but can answer the question related to cps - viscosity.
Are you sure that you're using the Mityvac in the right fashion, isn't there something blocked?
You need a vacuum for the resin to flow in right? Is there a vacuum in the damage?
Because the resin you are using, 20 cps, is not all that thick at all, you should be fine with the resin.
(Another problem could be: Are you sure that the resin is still fine and at 20cps? Has it been exposed to UV thus hardened? Before or during the repair process?)

Viscosity is the measurement of a fluid's internal resistance to flow.
The lower the number, the thinner the product, as a consequence, the higher the number, the thicker.
Water for example is 1 cps
Honey is 10.000 cps
Ketchup is 50.000 cps
Sour Cream is 100.000 cps

The above mentioned cps is at room temperatures.

CPS stands for Centipoise

Remember: you should always use the highest possible cps >in other words: the thickest possible resin.
Hope this helps a bit, good luck.
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t4k
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Re: I got a resin problem.

Post by t4k » October 8th, 2009, 5:38 am

Also remember, viscosity (Cp) changes with temperature. Water fluctuates from 1.79 at freezing to .305 at 200 F.

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Re: I got a resin problem.

Post by Brent Deines » October 8th, 2009, 9:21 am

I think it is important to understand that all three examples you gave can vary greatly. Honey for instance, can be very thin or almost a solid depending on the brand and how it is processed. For example most pourable honey is going to be somewhere in the broad range of 3000cps to 25000cps.

The viscosity of catsup varies greatly by brand but most are between 20,000 and 30,000 cps.

Sour cream varies by brand and whether it is non fat, low fat, etc., but again, I have never seen sour cream that is only 100cps as that would be thinner than vegetable oil.

Water at room temperature is approximately 1cps, skim milk is about 3.5 cps, whole milk is about 3.8cps, typical vegetable oil is around 60cps, 10w40 oil is about 190cps, and 20w50 oil is about 330cps.

So back to windshield repair resins. A low viscosity injectable resin (thin) is typically described as being between 5cps and 30cps. Medium viscosity resins are typically described as 40cps to 100cps. High viscosity resins are typically described as 100cps to 500cps. However, even a 500cps resin is relatively low viscosity, but not when it comes to a product that is typically used as an injection resin for windshield repair. Although it was recently mentioned by a technician on the windshield repair forum that Delta Kits Premium Plate Glass Resin (3600cps) was used for injection, that is not a common practice, or one that is recommended by Delta Kits.

A medium viscosity non-injectable windshield repair resin is commonly categorized in the 500cps to 2500cps range. Pit resins often fall into this category.

A high viscosity non-injectable windshield repair resin is commonly categorized in the 2500cps to 5000cps range. Plate glass resins often fall into this category.

Delta Kits sells injectable windshield repair resins in viscosities as low as 15cps, but also have 20cps 40cps, and 60cps, and custom blends of even higher viscosities of injectable resins available up to 500cps. However when using Delta Kits equipment we "recommend" using Magnibond 20cps for all repairs.

Delta Kits Premium Pit Resin is about 2000cps.

Delta Kits Premium Plate Glass Resin is about 3600cps.

Please note that there are different ways of measuring viscosity and many variables to consider, so in most cases a liquid product will have a "viscosity range", but for simplicity I am listing approximate average viscosities at room temperature for the products above. If you do a search in Google you will find a wide variety of results. For instance, if you search for "what is the viscosity of honey", you will probably be more confused than ever as no one seems to agree. That is partially because of the variables, but also because the Internet is full of non-factual information. The site I use most whenever this subject comes up is http://www.brookfieldengineering.com/ed ... cosity.asp. The Brookfield index well respected and they explain their testing and results better than most.

I am not an expert on this subject, but I have consulted experts and feel I have a reasonably good working knowledge of it. What is important for windshield repair technicians is that the resin they use is matched to the equipment they use and that it does what it is supposed to do. Although Delta Kits "thin" resins are considerably thicker than water, most technicians refer to it as water thin and very few of us can tell the difference between a 10cps resin and a 20cps resin if it were to be tested in unmarked bottles.
Brent Deines
Delta Kits, Inc.
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Jbrodie
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Re: I got a resin problem.

Post by Jbrodie » October 8th, 2009, 1:57 pm

I do use delta kits resin the Megabond but sometimes it doesn't want to go into the cracks. I used a lighter that helps a little. I'm thinking the sun is much stronger down here in Tampa Fl with the injector under a uv shield the glass must still be expanding making it dificult for the resin to fill in the cracks of a star break. If the megabond come in a higher vicosity if so I would like to try that out. Also I've stoped using the mityfac and went to the basic bridge and injector which is doing a much better job. I'm actualy thinking of getting a second bridge and injector and doing away with the mityvac.

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Re: I got a resin problem.

Post by screenman » October 8th, 2009, 2:15 pm

Talk us through your repair process step by step, you are definately doing something wrong, I have used Magnibond a long time in all temperatures and I have never had a problem filling a starbreak.

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Re: I got a resin problem.

Post by RCRNR » July 27th, 2018, 10:04 pm

I am also having the same problem of the repairs not filling all the way I don't think it is the bridge I think it is the magnibond resin the company I use to work for had the identical bridge but there resin must have been different being my repairs took 5 minutes would fill completely and would all but disappear?

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Re: I got a resin problem.

Post by screenman » July 30th, 2018, 9:46 am

How are you drying out? are you using a UV shield? so many variables, but what I would say is the magnibond resin is certainly not the problem, been using it for years and never had a problem.

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Re: I got a resin problem.

Post by Nomad » August 12th, 2018, 7:32 pm

Put some resin in the fridge one time so as to keep it fresh. It came out like honey, really high viscosity. Don't know what happened but the distributor said don't do that or it will thicken like it did. So are you using old resin? Fresh resin seems to work a lot better for me.

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