Quick question about very a very small chip

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HBCC
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Quick question about very a very small chip

Post by HBCC » February 2nd, 2015, 8:10 pm

If you have a very small chip with 2 x 3mm legs that look a little tight and you attempt to repair it and find the legs are too thin to take resin to the ends thus not having a complete repair would the proper procedure be to cure it, drill back into the centre of the impact, pop a bullseye and complete the repair as normal ?

Would this allow the repair to be completed correctly or would the resin already cured prevent resin from filling the small portion on the outer part of the legs ? Would I do something different altogether in this case ?

The only reason I ask is I only like to drill when necessary as drilling does cause a small blemish and I try to aim for the best appearance without compromising structural integrity.

Thanks for the help guys.

HBCC

P.S. I always warn my customers that I may have to drill even if I am 99% sure I don't and that a repair is for structural purposes only but the chip will look much better than it currently is.

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Re: Quick question about very a very small chip

Post by screenman » February 2nd, 2015, 11:20 pm

If that happened I would drill into the wet resin using a brand new bur, the trouble is the resin is a great lubricant so anything other than a new bur will normally just slip. A method I would use more often in these cases is to tap the pit with a sharp carbide tipped scribe, this will open up the damage without the use of a bur, often a cleaner way. Takes a bit of practice though, and courage.

I must add that I always decide to drill after a thorough inspection, using a magnifying glass if in doubt, prior to starting a repair.
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HBCC
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Re: Quick question about very a very small chip

Post by HBCC » February 3rd, 2015, 6:06 am

Thanks Screenman you are always very helpful.

Just to be certain, if the resin is not filling a tight leg, drill the wet resin into the chip impact point and pop a bullseye, then proceed as normal ?

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Brent Deines
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Re: Quick question about very a very small chip

Post by Brent Deines » February 3rd, 2015, 9:22 am

I agree with screenman. It's much easier to drill and fill the damage prior to curing and in most cases you will achieve better results. I have to tell you though, very seldom do I find the need to drill a star break even if the legs are very tight.

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Re: Quick question about very a very small chip

Post by bill lambeth » February 3rd, 2015, 4:20 pm

Just saying ! Saves you a lot of time if you DO drill! Not that much difference in cosmetics afterwards ! Maybe that does depend on if you are using a half inch drill bit !

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Re: Quick question about very a very small chip

Post by Brent Deines » February 3rd, 2015, 7:25 pm

It also depends on the system you are using and if you know how to use that system properly. I don't find it takes long at all to fill tight star breaks. On the other hand, for those who like to drill, I like to sell drill bits, so it's a win/win! :D
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Re: Quick question about very a very small chip

Post by Biffstermon » February 4th, 2015, 8:49 pm

I work on a lot of cars, and sometimes run into a situation where someone (not a professional) has dropped some glue or who knows what on the pit, thinking that would help. Then when i try to do a real repair, the crack is clogged with something and it does not fill properly. So I clean everything thoughly, and if there is any question in my mind I will drill just enough to reach the air in the crack.
I find it easier and ultimately faster, and the results are not that much different than if I took the chance and didn't drill at all. So I would say,"Don't limit yourself to a hard rule" sometimes being flexible can be more successful. :geek:

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Re: Quick question about very a very small chip

Post by Brent Deines » February 5th, 2015, 10:25 am

Biffstermon wrote:I work on a lot of cars, and sometimes run into a situation where someone (not a professional) has dropped some glue or who knows what on the pit, thinking that would help. Then when i try to do a real repair, the crack is clogged with something and it does not fill properly. So I clean everything thoughly, and if there is any question in my mind I will drill just enough to reach the air in the crack.
I find it easier and ultimately faster, and the results are not that much different than if I took the chance and didn't drill at all. So I would say,"Don't limit yourself to a hard rule" sometimes being flexible can be more successful. :geek:
If I'm not reasonably sure the damage will fill without drilling I will drill as well so in the case you cited I agree with you. There are very few "hard rules" for completing high quality windshield repairs, just different techniques based on experience, equipment, skills, etc. My point was simply that a skilled technician can usually tell if a break will need to be drilled or not prior to injecting the resin. Usually, but not always, we all get fooled from time to time. In my case I've done enough repairs that I know small star breaks don't typically need to be drilled. On the other hand, damage someone has already tried to fill is a condition that almost always requires me to drill.

I always opt for quality over quantity so even if not drilling only makes the finished repair look a little better, I don't drill. The time saved in filling is countered by the extra time it takes to drill so in most cases there is little or no net time savings to drilling, but even if there was, I would still take the time to do the best possible repair for my customers.

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Re: Quick question about very a very small chip

Post by HBCC » February 9th, 2015, 5:09 am

Thanks for all the replies gentlemen. It is great to hear different perspectives.

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