Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

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tre
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Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

Post by tre » May 17th, 2015, 2:54 pm

I recently started working as a kiosk-style windshield repair tech. I really try to manage expectations for my customers, but I feel that only about 50% of the time I overdeliver. I would like to take pride in my work, however there are some pieces of equipment my employer hasn't supplied, like a moisture evaporator. I do have a delta kit, but I'm not sure which model. I know a lot of it is practice, but I'm sure proper equipment plays a part too. My two concerns today are about moisture and making bullseyes.

As I said, I don't have a moisture evaporator, and I'm not really looking to spend much on equipment that I probably won't use after this summer (seasonal position). So what should I do about moisture? Should I heat with a lighter? I also don't have anything for bringing down the heat of the windshield afterwards. Is there an acceptable way for me to deal with this, or should I pass on damage with moisture in it?

Secondly, I have the 22001 Spring Hammer, but I only have the 26030 burs, and my bullseyes haven't been turning out nicely. I read something here about someone using a pin vise and needle? Should I do that, or should I just go ahead and purchase some 26020 burs?

Thanks

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Brent Deines
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Re: Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

Post by Brent Deines » May 18th, 2015, 9:49 am

If you don't have a moisture evaporator you can use a torch or heat gun. However, a decent heat gun will cost you about the same as a moisture evaporator and I don't typically recommend either the heat gun or torch because it's too easy to crack out the glass. I lighter is ineffective for removing moisture. It does not get hot enough and since you are heating from the inside you are having to get the PVB hotter than the glass on the outside. We often have moisture evaporators that have been used for demos or in training classes so before you do with a less effective solution give me a call. I'll try to find something to fit your budget or if nothing else I can give you some pointers that will help you if you choose to use a torch or heat gun. Cooling is also important and the 22395 heat exchanger is an inexpensive way to bring the temperature of the glass back to ambient temperature very quickly and safely.

The spring hammer was designed specifically to be used with the 26020 burs. The spring hammer point diameter, shape, and even the type of steel used, were carefully tested and selected so that when used in conjunction with the 26020 the results are consistent time after time. A needle is too sharp and the diameter is too small to produce the same quality or consistency. That's not to say it won't work, but we've done a great deal of testing and in order to get the same size bullseye with no spalling or cracking every time, you need to minimize your variables. Burs are cheap and if you don't at least try the right one you'll never know how well the spring hammer is capable of performing. There is also a particular technique to use when drilling to assure the hole is the size, shape and depth to produce optimal results.

The bottom line is that even if this is just a summer job, do it to the best of your ability. I get that you don't want to spend any of your own cash but if you can't convince your employer to provide the right tools for the job I think investing a few bucks on tools that will make your job easier and your customers happier is worth consideration.
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Re: Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

Post by nixquax » May 18th, 2015, 1:02 pm

When using your heat exchanger remember to use it "around" the area you want to cool. Do not put it directly on damage or it may crack out.
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Re: Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

Post by screenman » May 18th, 2015, 1:26 pm

Work around the outside and then bang on the middle for safer results, for me it is bang on the middle, there again though I do not overheat the damage first.

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Re: Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

Post by bill lambeth » May 18th, 2015, 2:28 pm

I can assure you in the real world not many people use a heat exchanger !!!! I agree that it needs to cool down . I have one and very rare find the need to use it . I use an evaporator almost everyday with my GW injector !

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Re: Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

Post by screenman » May 18th, 2015, 10:24 pm

In that case Bill you are either taking a very long time to do repairs or not doing them properly. Sounds harsh I know and likely I will be in trouble for it, but in tests and I have run a lot of them it takes a long time for the PVB and the glass to cool down from being heated up when left to its own devices. In fact I have warmed up a small break so that a leg disappears which does not take a lot of heat, only for that leg still to be closed 24 hours later, 20 seconds of the heat exchanger and it is open again.

Also when the glass is warm a chip can have very tight legs, the heat exchanger will shrink the surrounding glass and open these up very slightly.

Owning the tools is one thing, knowing how to use them is where training comes in.

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Re: Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

Post by Brent Deines » May 19th, 2015, 8:32 am

bill lambeth wrote:I can assure you in the real world not many people use a heat exchanger !!!! I agree that it needs to cool down . I have one and very rare find the need to use it . I use an evaporator almost everyday with my GW injector !
Well then they are buying them for Christmas ornaments and lying to us about what they are using them for. :D

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Re: Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

Post by screenman » May 19th, 2015, 11:01 am

I know all the one's I sell are being used, and people over here who do quality repairs give good feedback on them.

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Re: Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

Post by bill lambeth » May 19th, 2015, 2:24 pm

I forgot that I am on a Delta forum !!!! I really don't know why I am come back here ! I guess to make me giggle at people like you Screen ! I find it strange that Delta is the only one pushing this ! I will use if I am repairing 2 cars a day like you do screen ! But when you are repairing multiple cars at a time you have ample time to let them cool down . Sorry mate if I offended you !
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Re: Making bulleyes and dealing with moisture

Post by screenman » May 19th, 2015, 10:53 pm

So Bill let me get this correct, you warm them up and then let them cool down for 24 hours before doing the repair, seems odd. You know and so do I that I have in the past done a lot more repairs a day than you do so cut that lot out.

I know why you come on here and that is because it is the best forum for our trade in existence and always has been. The reason why we are the only one's pushing the heat exchanger is because we invented the use of it, the others will maybe catch up one day.

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